4mm Figures

4mm Figures

4mm Figures
These castings are available in sets (mostly of 4) and depict characters of the pre-Great War era. The subjects are taken from photographs and costume museums such as the Victoria and Albert Museum. Each figure is in a staionary pose, either standing or sitting (and lying on his back asleep). As well as detailed instructions for each figure in the description, there is a useful guide on figure painting (and animals).

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Product no.: 43219
£0.90
Delivery weight: 2 g

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Product no.: 43220
The lady with the parasol should be painted to represent wearing a pastel coloured summer dress and matching hat, with a contrasting waistband and yoke. Her complexion should be very pale. Her parasol should complement her costume.
£1.80
Delivery weight: 5 g

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Product no.: 43221
The dress of the woman holding the baby can be almost any colour, grey, mid-blue, red, green, mauve and so on. The toque (headress) should complement the dress colour, and she should have a pale complexion. The dress on the baby, whose face is covered, should be white or cream. The woman may be shown with or without complementing gloves
£1.80
Delivery weight: 5 g

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Product no.: 43222
The Rochdale mill girl would wear a dark coloured dress, white apron and her shawl would very likely be a rich red brown colour. She would wear clogs. Her tea flask would be tin or cream enamel. She would not wear gloves.
£1.80
Delivery weight: 5 g

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Product no.: 43223
The woman with the shopping basket is taken from a photograph of a scene in London’s Mile End Road in 1906. She is wearing a heavy woollen coat which could be in any of the darker shades. Her dress, too, is of a heavy, dark material. Her straw hat is coloured and decorated with flowers. The contents of her wicker basket are covered by a cloth. A white handkerchief, perhaps
£1.80

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Product no.: 43224
The Restaurant Car Steward would usually wear a white shirt, and black trousers and shoes. Depending on company livery there may be coloured piping on the trouser leg.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43225
The stationmaster is not a simple figure to paint. He wears a navy cap with a polished black peak and badge in gold. His coat and trousers are navy blue. The buttons on his coat would be plain black, gold or silver, depending on the company of your choice. His cap badge too might be silver in some instances. Some companies’ stationmasters had a gold band around the cap and/or gold around the cap peak. There was variation, too, in the gold badges, on the collars and braid on the cuffs.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43226
The man in the boater wears the cream flannel suit known as a “ditto”. It is relieved by a thin, pink stripe. His shirt is white and he wears a pink tie. His shoes are brown leather. As with all figures, after painting the head, paint the shirt and tie, then the remainder. If you wish to try the pink stripes, then it would be a good idea to paint him pink first, then paint the cream, leaving very narrow pink stripes. For later periods he could be painted to represent blazer and flannels.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43227
The man in the mackintosh and cap can be used as a driver of a horse drawn vehicle, although the modeller might have to use a little ingenuity to make him fit. If the coat is to represent a waterproof, then a fawn colour would be appropriate, otherwise choose a dark blue or brown. The flat cap would be of a tweed material. He is shown wearing the shorter trousers fashionable in the Edwardian period, and boots. These would be brown or black. The trousers should be brown, blue green or tweed. His complexion should be pale if upper class, and more worn if working class.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43228
The teenage girl should be in a pastel coloured suit, black stockings and shoes, white or cream blouse, straw boater with a black band. Her picnic basket should be light brown.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43229
The seated woman reading the book would best be represented wearing a tweed jacket, mid-brown skirt and a cream or white blouse. The boater should be straw coloured with a wide coloured band above the brim. This may have coloured stripes, and a neat bow on the left side.
£1.80

Not in stock
This product is subject to possible delivery delays.

Product no.: 43230
The seated lady in the floral hat can be painted either as wearing a dress, or in a blouse and skirt. If in a dress, it should be in a delicate pastel shade. If in a skirt and blouse, the skirt should be in a dark colour, such as chocolate or navy. In which case the blouse should be white, cream or a very pale shade of the same colour as the skirt. There is an opportunity here to show the lace on the front of the blouse in a complementary colour. She should be wearing gloves. The imagination can be left to run riot with regard to her hat, but it should complement the rest of her costume.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43231
The man in the kilt is an interesting painting proposition. We suggest that his jacket and cap be painted green tweed, his socks green, sporran and shoes brown leather. Each modeller may have his own pet plaid, if not, then these simple tips may be of use. The stripe technique will not help here, so this is how we suggest the modeller tackle this one. Fist, paint the kilt dark green, don’t forget the shades in the pleats. Next, using a ”000” brush, paint a yellow check pattern all over it, like so many noughts and crosses boards. Then repeat the process using red. Be consistent and keep to the same side of the yellow lines throughout. Complete him by adding a walking stick.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43232
The seated man in the suit can be painted in a number of ways. He could be in a black jacket and pinstripe trousers or in a suit of matching material. For example, brown, grey or dark blue. He could also be wearing tweeds. His shoes would be black or brown, depending on the colour of the suit.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43233
The man wearing an Inverness cape and deer stalker could quite easily be used to represent Sherlock Holmes. The Inverness cape should be tweed as should be the deer stalker. His trousers too could be tweed, but equally he could wear grey, blue, brown or green. As the dress is informal, brown shoes are recommended. To finish him off, he needs a walking stick, again, because it is informal wear, a brown stick would be appropriate.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43234
The man wearing an overcoat with an Astrakhan collar and bowler hat could represent Dr. Watson. He is dressed in more formal wear than Mr. Holmes. The coat should be navy blue, the collar black. His scarf would quite possibly be light grey. The trousers would be pinstripe. His gloves and shoes black. The Gladstone bag would be battered brown leather with brass fittings.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43235
The gentleman in a suit and bowler could be Inspector Le Strade. He should be painted in a black jacket and pinstripe or in a suit of matching material. For example, brown, grey or dark blue. He could also be portrayed wearing tweeds. His shoes would be black or brown, depending on the colour of the suit. However, if he were to be painted wearing brown, green or tweed, then the bowler should be brown; otherwise black. To complete him, he should have a stick made from wire. This should be ebony if wearing pinstripes and black jacket, or if in a navy blue suit, otherwise it should be wood. He may be painted wearing gloves or not, black for formal wear, brown for less formal.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43236
The police constable should be entirely navy blue. Buttons, collar numbers, the number in the centre of the helmet plate and the snake clasp on the belt should be silver. His belt should be black leather. It would be a comparatively simple matter to convert him into a PC of an earlier period by carefully removing the back of the helmet, then cutting it down and altering it into a kepi.
£1.80

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This product is subject to possible delivery delays.

Product no.: 43237
The spaniel is sitting waiting for his/her train with his/her master/mistress. It could be painted light brown, or white with black patches. A lead may be cut as a sliver of plastic from a suitably coloured plastic bag.
£0.90

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Product no.: 43238
The little girl is quite a simple project. Her dress can be black, navy, dark brown or green. The apron should be white. Her stockings and shoes black. The boater should be straw coloured with a wide coloured band above the brim. This may have coloured stripes, and a neat bow on the left side.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43239
The Edwardian army still wore scarlet and blue. Trousers were a dark blue, as with the modern Brigade of Guards, with a narrow red stripe along the outside seam. Tunics were scarlet with facings appropriate to the regiment concerned. Royal regiments, with the exception of the Royal Irish, wore blue facings. The facings of, for example, the Devons were Lincoln green, while the Suffolks wore yellow. The facing colours were worn on the sleeve cuffs and around the collar. White piping should also be portrayed around the sleeve facing. Belts were white and buckles of brass. If, however, you are modelling the 1920’s and 30’s, then he will still be of use to you as a Royal Marine or even a fireman. As a fireman he should simply be painted navy blue with brass buttons and cap badge.
£1.80

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Product no.: 43240
If the farmer riding his carthorse could not afford a riding horse then he certainly could not afford a saddle. A simple rope halter will do for a bridle. Use a piece of 5 amp fuse wire to represent this. A single strand should run from the side of the horse’s nose, in a loop up to the underside of the rider’s hands. The farmer was likely to wear a tweed jacket, and a brown or black bowler hat. His trousers might be brown corduroy, with brown leather gaiters and boots.
£1.80
Delivery weight: 5 g

In stock
can be shipped within 3 days

Product no.: 43241
Horses come in many colours - bays, roans, pintos to name just a few. White horses are classified as being grey, truly white horses are very rare, as are truly black ones. Stockings and blazes are a very common feature on horses and come in a variety of shapes and sizes. The hooves vary in colour too. Generally the lighter the horse, the lighter the hoof and vice versa. They are never naturally black. The mane and tail are the same colour. With chestnuts they are darker than the back and flank. The lighter being the case with a roan. The skin around the muzzle is pinkish and or grey, while that around the eye is most often a very dark grey. One technique for painting the texture of animals coats, is to paint the animal with oil paints and then to dust it lightly with CARR’S WEATHERING POWDERS of the appropriate shades (Try Shades of Mud) This gives a velvety texture to the animal.
£1.80
Delivery weight: 8 g

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can be shipped within 3 days

Product no.: 43242
The farm labourer having had a surfeit of cider, is sleeping it off. It was a common practice for farmers to provide cider for their employees’ lunch. His hat should be brown as should be his corduroy trousers. His smock should be white or cream, probably a bit grubby. These were often elaborately embroidered. While it is true that the cider in its brown and cream flagon would have been provided by his employer, it is extremely doubtful that the sleeping off would be approved of.
£1.80
Delivery weight: 4 g

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can be shipped within 3 days

Product no.: 43243
During the first one or two years of King Edward's reign, black and greys were predominant. Then red and cream became popular. Later there were a multitude of delicate shades of fawns, pink, blue and soft greens. Often dresses were trimmed with contrasting colours such as light brown or green. White was common for afternoon summer dresses, and other pastel colours trimmed with ribbons or flowers. Gloves, usually white, grey or black, depending on the costume, were worn by all who could afford them. Blouses were worn a great deal. The hats of the period were frequently enormous. They were decorated with flowers, ostrich plumes or soft drapery. Do not forget that being wealthy, her parasol would match the dress.
£1.80
Delivery weight: 5

In stock
can be shipped within 3 days

Product no.: 43244
The man in the morning coat should be shown wearing a black top hat and coat, grey pinstripe trousers, dark or light waistcoat, depending on the season. White spats should be seen below his trousers. His umbrella should be black, with black or brown woodwork. The ferule would be brass or silver.
£1.80
Delivery weight: 5 g

In stock
can be shipped within 3 days

Product no.: 43245
The seated coachman would wear a black silk top hat, white cravat, navy or dark green coat, off-white breeches, black boots with brown tops and white gloves. The collars of the coat should be black. He should be identical to the footman, if used together.
£1.80
Delivery weight: 4 g

Not in stock
This product is subject to possible delivery delays.

Product no.: 43246
The standing footman would wear a black silk top hat, white cravat, navy or dark green coat, off-white breeches, black boots with brown tops and white gloves. The collars of the coat should be black. He should be dressed identical to the seated coachman if used together.
£1.80
Delivery weight: 4 g

In stock
can be shipped within 3 days

Product no.: 43247
The standing soldier is based on a member of the 12th Lancers in 1906. The tunic was navy blue. Scarlet piping was worn on the tunic flap, skirt and on the seams up the back of the tunic, and down the back of the sleeves. The belt was yellow with two horizontal red stripes. The trousers bore a wide yellow stripe with scarlet piping down the centre. The shoulder straps were yellow. The peak which by this time they had fitted to the Brodrick was black leather. Blue quartering braid was also worn on the Brodrick. The cap lines were yellow and spurs were polished steel. White gloves were worn with walking out dress.
£1.80
Delivery weight: 6 g

In stock
can be shipped within 3 days

Product no.: 43248
The woman with the open parasol wears a summer dress, and a bolero jacket. A good choice would be beige or biscuit, trimmed brown around the collar and foot of the skirt.
£1.80
Delivery weight: 5 g

In stock
can be shipped within 3 days

31 - 60 of 67 results